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Monday, May 11, 2020 | History

3 edition of Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica found in the catalog.

Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica

Samuel Kirkland Lothrop

Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica

by S.K. Lothrop

by Samuel Kirkland Lothrop

  • 381 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Peabody Museum in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of Central America -- Costa Rica -- Antiquities,
  • Costa Rica -- Antiquities

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 139-142

    SeriesPapers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University -- v. 51, Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University -- vol. 51
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 142 p.
    Number of Pages142
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17855591M
    LC Control Number64000329

    Ivar Zapp standing astride one of the hundreds of stone spheres dotting the landscape around the Diquis Delta region of Costa Rica. Authors Zapp and Erikson believe that these stone spheres, which point to major Neolithic sites around the world, sat at the heart of a major maritime culture. Debunking the "Mystery" of the Stone Balls. by John W. Hoopes. The stone balls of Costa Rica have been the object of pseudoscientific speculations since the publication of Erich von Däniken's Chariots of the Gods in More recently, they have gained renewed attention as the result of books such as Atlantis in America- Navigators of the Ancient World, by Ivar Zapp and George Erikson.

    The Archaeology of the Central Pacific Coast of Costa Rica. Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica, S. K. Lothrop. Volume An Anthropological Reconnaissance in West Pakistan, , Henry Field. Volume La Victoria: An Early Site on the Pacific Coast of Guatemala, Michael D. Coe. Vol no. 1. Craniometry and Multivariate Analysis: The Jomon Population of Japan, by.

    Hotel Diquis Del Sur features an outdoor swimming pool, garden, a terrace and bar in Ojochal. Featuring a concierge service, this property also provides guests with a . Precolumbian Man Finds Costa Rica. Peabody Museum Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts. The most complete discussion of the stone balls in print remains: Lothrop, Samuel K. Archaeology of the Diquis Delta, Costa Rica. Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Vol. Harvard University, Cambridge.


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Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica by Samuel Kirkland Lothrop Download PDF EPUB FB2

Archaeology of the Diquis Delta, Costa Rica: Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Vol.

51 [S. Lothrop] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Archaeology of the Diquis Delta, Costa Rica: Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology Author: S. Lothrop. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Lothrop, S.K.

(Samuel Kirkland), Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica. Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A. Book: All Authors / Contributors: S K Lothrop. Find more information about: OCLC Number: Add tags for "Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica". Be the first. Similar Items.

Related Subjects: (5) Costa Rica -- Antiquities. Indians of Central America -- Costa Rica -- Antiquities. Click on the article title to read by: 1.

One of the strangest mysteries in archaeology was discovered in the Diquis Delta of Costa Rica. In the s, the United Fruit Company planted huge quantities of bananas in this region. Workers clearing forests found numerous spherical stones.

The balls were perfectly round and were anywhere from a few Archaeology of the Diquís Delta to over 8 feet in diameter. They were composed of solid granodiorite; a. When the stone spheres, Costa Rica, there was a momentary period of exhaustive study, subsequently years of a long gap until interest rose on this object in the s, preceding to their current position as valuable archaeological examination just like any other striking Mesoamerican artefact.

Till date, more than stones have been discovered in the Diquis Delta and on Isla Del Cano. One of the strangest mysteries in archaeology was discovered in the Diquis Delta of Costa Rica.

Since the s, hundreds of stone balls have been documented, ranging in size from a few centimetres to over two meters in diameter. Some weigh 16 tons. Almost all of them are made of granodiorite, a hard, igneous stone.

The four archaeological sites are Finca 6, Batambal, El Silencio, and Grijalba All of them are located in the Diquís’ Delta and relate to the pre-Columbian chiefdom colonies existing between A.D.

Within the Diquis Delta, many of the spheres come from a few sites in a banana plantation in the Sierpe-Térraba Delta. However, there are a number of other sites containing spheres in that part of Costa Rica, and spheres have been documented in at least one site in Panama. Stones Spheres of Costa Rica One of the strangest mysteries in archaeology was discovered in the Diquis Delta of Costa Rica.

Since the s, hundreds of stone balls have been documented, ranging in size from a few centimetres to over two meters. Introduction One of the strangest mysteries in archaeology was discovered in the Diquis Delta of Costa Rica. Since the s, hundreds of stone balls have been documented, ranging in size from a few centimetres to over two meters in diameter.

Some weigh 16 tons. Almost all of them are made of granodiorite, a hard, igneous [ ]. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica in SearchWorks catalog Skip to search Skip to main content.

Lothrop, Samuel K. "Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica, Vol. " Cambridge: Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Quintanilla, Ifigenia.

Esferas precolombinas de Costa Rica. San José, Costa Rica: Fundación Museos del Banco Central de Costa Rica, Stone, Doris Z. The stone spheres of Costa Rica are an assortment of over three hundred petrospheres found in Costa Rica, located on the Diquís Delta and on Isla del y, they are also known as bolas de piedra (literally stone balls).The spheres are commonly attributed to the extinct Diquis culture and are sometimes referred to as the Diquís are the best-known stone sculptures of the Designated: (38th session).

Some archaeological sites are so unusual that they still present mysteries decades after they were found. Take the Diquis Delta in southeastern Costa Rica, where there are hundreds of almost. Precolumbian Chiefdom Settlements with Stone Spheres of the Diquís.

The property includes four archaeological sites located in the Diquís Delta in southern Costa Rica, which are considered unique examples of the complex social, economic and.

The four archaeological sites of Finca 6, Batambal, El Silencio and Grijalba-2 together form a property area of close to 25 hectares and are surrounded by four separate buffer zones amounting to almost hectares.

The sites are located in the Diquís Delta in southern Costa Rica and represent Precolumbian chiefdom settlements with. The results of Lothrop’s research were published in ’s Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica. ByUniversity of Kansas researcher John Hoopes was evaluating the spheres’ eligibility as a protected UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Almost immediately, the mysterious spheres became prized ornaments, ending up on the front yards of government buildings and fruit company executives throughout Costa Rica. Many spheres were also broken or damaged and others were dynamited in a time when few realized their archaeological value.

Discover Diquís Spheres in Costa Rica: These mysterious ancient stone spheres were created by a civilization lost to time and are now mostly lawn ornaments. Archaeology of the Diquís Delta, Costa Rica.

Papers of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Cambridge: Harvard University. Quilter, Jeffrey. Cobble Circles and Standing Stones: Archaeology at the Rivas Site, Costa Rica.

Iowa City: University of Iowa Press. Snarskis, Michael J. "The Archaeology of Costa Rica.".The simple fact of the spheres is that they were made by the indigenous peoples of pre-Columbian Costa Rica, likely part of the Diquís culture.

They first started being made around the yearand continued past the year but ceased production prior to the arrival of the Spaniards.[13], Lothrop, Kirkland, Samuel Archaeology of the Diquis Delta, Costa Rica. Memoirs of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, 51 Harvard University Press: Cambridge.

[14], Snarskis, Michael, J. Symbolism of Gold in Costa Rica and its archaeological .